How to Build a Simple Film Business Plan to Get Investors on Board

Hosted by Bryce C. Campell

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Bryce C. Campell

Webinar hosted by: Bryce C. Campell

Distribution & Marketing Executive (Open Road, Miramax)

With over thirteen years of experience in film distribution, Bryce C. Campbell is one of the leading distribution and marketing executives in the industry. Bryce got his start working at Miramax Films in 2004 where he honed his skills in theatrical sales and excelled in this area until the closing of the company in 2010. In 2011, Bryce began working with Open Road Films as the Vice President of Operations for Distribution and Marketing. In this role, he oversaw vendor relations, finance and film budgets, as well as handling sales with a concentration in the US and Caribbean territories. Working for a smaller company allowed Bryce to be more heavily involved in the post production aspect of studio life, as well as working collaboratively with the marketing team to provide data-driven insights on a wide range of marketing components such as one-sheets, trailers, and special events. One of his key interests is negotiating distribution deals with filmmakers and leveraging industry analytics to provide insight into box office potential for each project. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

One of the hardest parts of being an artist is understanding the business part of the “film business”. You very likely have the “art” part down--you have a script; you’re an actor; you learned how to direct, etc--but as you set out to make the magnum opus that is your film, you quickly realize that you are spending way more time talking about legal documents, business prospectus, waterfalls, and returns on investment. It’s not what anyone signed up for when they set out to be artists, but it’s still absolutely part of the job. This doesn’t need to be a bad thing, though. Understanding the business side of your craft and learning how to work within this world will give you the ability to ultimately create the art you want to make.

Unless you already have a personal fortune at hand to put towards creating your project, you’re going to need to work with non-artists, executives, and financiers to find the funding to turn your vision into a reality. This means you’ll need to convince them that your project is worth investing in. A solid business plan can help you achieve this goal. A great business plan will get investors excited, it will tell them who you are as a filmmaker, and most importantly, it will translate your project from a creative language to the business language that investors more readily understand. This is no small feat, but it’s a critical step in getting your film made. If you can learn to speak investors’ language, they will help you speak yours. So what does a great business plan look like and how can you make your own to position your project for optimal success?

With over thirteen years of experience in film distribution, Bryce C. Campbell is one of the leading distribution and marketing executives in the industry. Bryce got his start working at Miramax Films and later began working with Open Road Films as the Vice President of Operations for Distribution and Marketing. In this role, he oversaw vendor relations, finance and film budgets, as well as handling sales with a concentration in the US and Caribbean territories. One of his key interests is negotiating distribution deals with filmmakers and leveraging industry analytics to provide insight into box office potential for each project. Bryce’s heavy experience with the business side of filmmaking has given him a wealth of knowledge of how best filmmakers can get buyers on their side, and he’s sharing what he knows exclusively with Stage 32.

Bryce will show you how to talk business and present business materials that “non-artists” can appreciate. Specifically he will walk you through building a strong and convincing business plan. He’ll explain how to make a strong opening statement, with examples, and he’ll show you what needs to be broken down at the beginning. He’ll delve into what should be included in your bio and what can be taken out for buyers to be interested in working with you. He’ll go over the 4 key things that need to be in your business plan when discussing your project and will demonstrate what you need to get an investor to trust you. He’ll spend time talking about research and comps and how to use these for films and talent. He’ll then teach you how to show an investor they will make money back on your film. Finally Bryce will explain how to create a strong closing summary and leave investors with a good impression. Through Bryce’s lecture, even the least business-savvy artist can gain valuable skills to better present their project to buyers and find the money and business partners needed to find success.

What You'll Learn

  • What Do You Want?
    • How to make a strong opening statement, with examples
    • What needs to be broken down at the beginning of the business plan
  • Who Are You?
    • What exactly needs to be in your bio and what can be taken out?
    • Who should you feature that is involved in your project and how?
  • What Is Your Project? Thinking Like an Investor
    • The 4 key things that MUST be in your business plan when discussing your project.
    • Understanding what you need to get an investor to trust you
    • Research & comps – what you need to know for films & talent
    • ROI – How to show an investor they will make their money back
    • Coffee is for closers – how to bring home a strong closing summary
  • Q&A with Bryce

About Your Instructor

With over thirteen years of experience in film distribution, Bryce C. Campbell is one of the leading distribution and marketing executives in the industry. Bryce got his start working at Miramax Films in 2004 where he honed his skills in theatrical sales and excelled in this area until the closing of the company in 2010. In 2011, Bryce began working with Open Road Films as the Vice President of Operations for Distribution and Marketing. In this role, he oversaw vendor relations, finance and film budgets, as well as handling sales with a concentration in the US and Caribbean territories. Working for a smaller company allowed Bryce to be more heavily involved in the post production aspect of studio life, as well as working collaboratively with the marketing team to provide data-driven insights on a wide range of marketing components such as one-sheets, trailers, and special events. One of his key interests is negotiating distribution deals with filmmakers and leveraging industry analytics to provide insight into box office potential for each project.

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A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

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