Producing Without Borders: International Co-Productions

Hosted by Brendan Foley

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Brendan Foley

Webinar hosted by: Brendan Foley

Writer, Producer, and Director

Brendan Foley is a screenwriter, feature film director, producer and best-selling author. His feature films include multi-award winning action drama Johnny Was (Sony), thriller The Riddle (Image Ent/Mail on Sunday) with 2.6 million DVDs, and satire Legend of the Bog (Lionsgate). They starred Sir Derek Jacobi, Vinnie Jones, Vanessa Redgrave, Roger Daltrey and many others. Brendan is also a Writer-For-Hire for studio and independent projects such as immigration drama Addae’s Journey for Devonshire Productions, Endurance for Denmark’s Hannover Film and the upcoming Bus Pass Road Trip for Sir Derek Jacobi and friends. In TV drama, Brendan wrote the pilot for Danish drama Dr Feelgood for Monday TV. He is currently working on a new drama series with the BBC and Northern Ireland Screen (UK home of Game of Thrones). His past work has also been backed by the Irish Film Board, Danish Film Institute, Creative Europe and BLS Film Fund Italy. In animation, Brendan is co-creator of children’s environmental animated series Shelldon (NBC) and the Asian hit series Byrdland (GMM Grammy/ Shellhut). In books, his WWII escape biography Under the Wire became an international bestseller and was named Best New Writing by Waterstones bookstores. As a producer, Brendan works under the banner of The Proper Picture Company, alongside international producers Gavin James and Ned Dowd, whose past movies include: Apocalypto, Last of the Mohicans, King Arthur, Alexander and Hoffa. Prior to working in film and books, Brendan was an award-winning features journalist covering business, the environment and conflict in 77 countries world-wide, from bomb disposal in Angola to oil spills in Alaska. He also ran his own print and video consultancy that won the PR Week Award, three times. His international clients included Texaco, Hawker-Siddeley, Chevron, Coca-Cola and India's Tata Steel. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

In the world of independent film and TV, productions are increasingly crossing borders in search of funding, locations and ultimately a wider audience. But the difference between a successful international co-production and an international road-crash often lies in the details of choice of partners, structures and creative material.

In this exclusive Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, Brendan Foley, an international producer (11 countries), writer and director with award winning feature films, TV series and best-selling books to his credit, will give an in-depth look at the pros and cons of international co-production. You will learn about different types of producing partners - creative, financial, public and private. You will also learn when co-producing makes sense for you or your project and when it should be avoided.

You will leave this webinar with an understanding of not only what makes an international co-production work, but how to look for producing partners, co-funders and how to protect yourself and your project along the way. This seminar is useful to Producers considering a co-production as well as writers, actors and directors who feel their talent or material would work best on an international scale.

PLUS - Brendan will have on two special guests: Ronni Coulter, SVP Business Affairs Sony Animation and top European co-producer Lars Hermann (CEO Copenhagen Film Festival and Danish state broadcaster DR, former Nordisk, Filmfyn Film Fund,)

Special Guests: Ronni Coulter (SVP Business Affairs Sony Animation) Lars Hermann (Copenhagen Film Festival)

What You'll Learn

  • Why co-produce?
  • When to avoid co-producing
  • The one key skill of co-production and how to ensure all partners are satisfied with the terms
  • Working across borders and why it can be twice the headache
  • Understanding types of funding - It's a small, small world
    • European co-productions 
    • USA - studio and indie 
    • Canada 
    • India and China 
    • UK 
    • Rest of world - case by case
    • Hollywood still dominates but how international markets play into that
  • Creative partners
    • How to ensure everyone is making the same movie
    • Pecking order is key - how that looks
    • Rewards and penalties
    • Who gets to give notes?
    • Advice or orders?
  • The top co-production budget issues and how to avoid them
  • Navigating cultural differences - what you will come across and how to manage
  • Financial partners
    • Putting the puzzle together - order matters
    • Private finance - mad, bad or both?
    • Public finance - local and national
    • Facilities finance 
    • Rewards and penalties
    • Culture
  • The paper trail
    • Actors, getting reads, attachments
    • Sales estimates 
    • "Bankable paper"
    • Finance LOIs
    • Interparty agreements, dual language
    • Deliverables
  • Studio case study - SONY
    • Johnny Was
  • Negotiating With Partners
  • European Perspective
    • Special guest Lars Hermann
  • Studio Perspective.
    • Special guest Ronnie Coulter
  • Recorded, in-depth Q&A with Brendan

About Your Instructor

Brendan Foley is a screenwriter, feature film director, producer and best-selling author. His feature films include multi-award winning action drama Johnny Was (Sony), thriller The Riddle (Image Ent/Mail on Sunday) with 2.6 million DVDs, and satire Legend of the Bog (Lionsgate). They starred Sir Derek Jacobi, Vinnie Jones, Vanessa Redgrave, Roger Daltrey and many others.

Brendan is also a Writer-For-Hire for studio and independent projects such as immigration drama Addae’s Journey for Devonshire Productions, Endurance for Denmark’s Hannover Film and the upcoming Bus Pass Road Trip for Sir Derek Jacobi and friends.

In TV drama, Brendan wrote the pilot for Danish drama Dr Feelgood for Monday TV. He is currently working on a new drama series with the BBC and Northern Ireland Screen (UK home of Game of Thrones). His past work has also been backed by the Irish Film Board, Danish Film Institute, Creative Europe and BLS Film Fund Italy.

In animation, Brendan is co-creator of children’s environmental animated series Shelldon (NBC) and the Asian hit series Byrdland (GMM Grammy/ Shellhut).

In books, his WWII escape biography Under the Wire became an international bestseller and was named Best New Writing by Waterstones bookstores.

As a producer, Brendan works under the banner of The Proper Picture Company, alongside international producers Gavin James and Ned Dowd, whose past movies include: Apocalypto, Last of the Mohicans, King Arthur, Alexander and Hoffa.

Prior to working in film and books, Brendan was an award-winning features journalist covering business, the environment and conflict in 77 countries world-wide, from bomb disposal in Angola to oil spills in Alaska. He also ran his own print and video consultancy that won the PR Week Award, three times. His international clients included Texaco, Hawker-Siddeley, Chevron, Coca-Cola and India's Tata Steel.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

  • The problem was that you couldn't understand them for the first 1/2 hour, and it mostly seemed like they were chit chatting for the first hour. When the valuable information came, it didn't seem like much. I suggest this only if your really ready to do an international co-production
  • Informative and relatively comprehensive. A good crash course in international coproductions.

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This includes deciding on the format that will work best for your story, how to adapt your writing style to short form when you’re used to writing features or television, and whether you will use a narrator or go full “radio play”. He’ll also give you tips on how to plan for sound while starting to write. Mike will next go into detail on breaking your long form story into multiple short form episodes. He’ll give you tips on extending your story and show you where to put episode breaks within it. He’ll go over building tension between episodes between episodes and what goes into good cliffhangers on podcasts. He’ll also talk about how to avoid needing recaps between episodes. Next Mike will spend time talking about other writing challenges that come with this format, including how to paint a picture in audio form without creating awkward dialogue, the process of holding on to your subplots without your storytelling getting choppy, and how to use your first episode to grab your audience. He’ll also offer tips of how to give your characters separate voices. Finally, Mike will use his own podcast SENTINELS: POINT OF NO RETURN, which was originally written as a feature, to illustrate the process of adapting for podcasts. He’ll even share samples of both the feature and podcast versions of the SENTINELS script. If you’re excited about podcasts, curious about writing your own or adapting your feature script into one and don’t even know where to begin, start here.   Praise for Mike's Stage 32 Webinar   FIVE STARS FOR MIKE!!! He is super-awesome! Can't wait for the next session. -Robert S.   "Mike Disa is definitely one of the best. He provided advice that is actionable." -Martin R.   "I loved how engaging Mike was. It felt like he was genuine and addressing each of us almost individually. I have honestly never had a better Stage32 experience!" -Elle C.   "It was great to hear from Mike. What a professional and what great advice from someone who knows the business and the craft of writing for podcasts." -Mary S.

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