The Business of Unscripted/Reality TV & the Best Way to Develop and Pitch It

Hosted by Angela Molloy, WE tv

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Angela Molloy, WE tv

Webinar hosted by: Angela Molloy, WE tv

VP of Development at WE tv (also worked with TLC, OWN, A&E, HGTV, Esquire)

Angela Molloy is WE tv’s vice president of development, based in the network’s Los Angeles office. She works closely with west coast based production partners and agencies to find fresh new unscripted programming for the network. She is currently an Executive Producer on WE tv series L.A. Hair, Marriage Boot Camp, and Bridezillas. Prior to WE tv, Molloy worked as a production, development and acquisitions executive. She was a freelance showrunner with co-executive producer credits on Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles for Bravo, A Sale of Two Cities for HGTV, Extreme Homes for Discovery Channel, and served as the executive producer for Mansion Hunters on Reelz Channel. She also produced a number of pilots and series for a variety of networks including OWN (Life with La Toya), TLC (Maria and Courtney’s Wedding Fiesta), Esquire, A&E, and HGTV (Room Crashers). In 2008, Molloy finished a one-year run with the TLC cable network as a Director of Programming. She took pitches for the network and helped oversee production on a number of new series and event specials including The Miss America Pageant. This marked a return to TLC after Molloy spent four years at the corporate headquarters in Maryland as an acquisitions and development manager. Prior to joining the LA-based TLC team, Molloy was vice president of international at 3Ball Productions. In just over two years, she helped develop and produce Scott Baio is 45…And Single, The Pick Up Artist, and I Know My Kid’s a Star for VH1; and multiple pilots and development projects for Fox, Sci Fi, HGTV, Bravo, Comedy Central, E!, and syndicated shows. She was also the primary liaison with Eyeworks International. Traveling to MIP and other markets, she handled all US development of Eyeworks’ international formats – adapting them for US pitch. She also pitched 3Ball’s US projects in development to Eyeworks territories all over the world. Molloy began her career with WETA-TV, the PBS affiliate and third largest producer of all national PBS programs. Molloy scheduled WETA’s daytime and acquired programming from other PBS stations and independent producers. She also worked at PBS’ headquarters in Alexandria, VA to help launch PBS Online’s Station Relations group. As the senior associate, she created and marketed online integration opportunities to all 349 PBS member stations. Molloy holds a B.A. in Professional Writing and French from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

There is a myth in the television industry right now: more channels mean it’s easier to sell a show, right? WRONG! The diversification of television and the dominance of streaming services over linear cable have made it HARDER to sell unscripted programming. Why? Because there are too many places for the audience to go. In order to get a hit, networks have to become specialized and truly define their brand in order to stand out.

You can no longer just pitch IDEAS to networks. IDEAS are not STORIES and they’re not SERIES. There is a lot more work (research, interviews, and writing) that has to go into a pitch before you can take it to a network. Bomb a pitch and a network might not let you in the door again.

Angela Molloy is one of the original unscripted executives having been in the game since 2001, when it was just getting started. She’s also one of the only executives who has been a network buyer, a production company development executive (seller), and an Executive Producer in the field. In this webinar you’ll learn get an overall sense of the reality landscape and concrete essential tips for how to develop and pitch into it. Sign up today to make sure you don’t get caught with your pants down during a pitch!

 

What You'll Learn

  • Overall landscape of linear television and streaming service buyers
  • Number of reality shows in the marketplace
  • Budgets, schedules, and production basics of reality TV development, pilots, presentations, and series
  • What are networks looking to buy?
  • Understanding buyers and how development departments work
  • What are networks looking for in a pitch?
  • How do you put a pitch together?
  • What materials do you need for a pitch?
  • What should a pitch look like?
  • Pitching 101 Checklist
  • How to get in the door/representation
  • What paperwork do you need?
  • Q&A with Angela!

About Your Instructor

Angela Molloy is WE tv’s vice president of development, based in the network’s Los Angeles office. She works closely with west coast based production partners and agencies to find fresh new unscripted programming for the network. She is currently an Executive Producer on WE tv series L.A. Hair, Marriage Boot Camp, and Bridezillas.

Prior to WE tv, Molloy worked as a production, development and acquisitions executive. She was a freelance showrunner with co-executive producer credits on Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles for Bravo, A Sale of Two Cities for HGTV, Extreme Homes for Discovery Channel, and served as the executive producer for Mansion Hunters on Reelz Channel.

She also produced a number of pilots and series for a variety of networks including OWN (Life with La Toya), TLC (Maria and Courtney’s Wedding Fiesta), Esquire, A&E, and HGTV (Room Crashers).

In 2008, Molloy finished a one-year run with the TLC cable network as a Director of Programming. She took pitches for the network and helped oversee production on a number of new series and event specials including The Miss America Pageant. This marked a return to TLC after Molloy spent four years at the corporate headquarters in Maryland as an acquisitions and development manager.

Prior to joining the LA-based TLC team, Molloy was vice president of international at 3Ball Productions. In just over two years, she helped develop and produce Scott Baio is 45…And Single, The Pick Up Artist, and I Know My Kid’s a Star for VH1; and multiple pilots and development projects for Fox, Sci Fi, HGTV, Bravo, Comedy Central, E!, and syndicated shows. She was also the primary liaison with Eyeworks International. Traveling to MIP and other markets, she handled all US development of Eyeworks’ international formats – adapting them for US pitch. She also pitched 3Ball’s US projects in development to Eyeworks territories all over the world.

Molloy began her career with WETA-TV, the PBS affiliate and third largest producer of all national PBS programs. Molloy scheduled WETA’s daytime and acquired programming from other PBS stations and independent producers. She also worked at PBS’ headquarters in Alexandria, VA to help launch PBS Online’s Station Relations group. As the senior associate, she created and marketed online integration opportunities to all 349 PBS member stations.

Molloy holds a B.A. in Professional Writing and French from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

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