Top 5 Best Practices Before the Launch of Your Successful Digital Series (Web Series)

Hosted by Brian Rodda

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Brian Rodda

Webinar hosted by: Brian Rodda

Television Academy Member & Digital Marketing Consultant

Brian Rodda has vast experience in viral marketing and has worked passionately in YouTube Strategy and Social Media strategy since 2007. He is a founding member of an aggregator for WGA written web series, and took that experience to found Brian Rodda Consulting in 2011. Brian has worked on promoting numerous notable digital series, including: Husbands (31,143 Subscribers, 2,145,151 views on Youtube) the web’s first marriage-equality comedy, Squaresville (31,401 Subscribers, 1,772,230 views on Youtube) and Whole Day Down ( Starring Willie Garson, Successful 40K+ Kickstarter campaign). Additionally, Brian has consulted with over 60 content creators to promote and create thriving communities for their properties, including Tello Films and Croissant Man (Vimeo Staff Pick). For the past two years, Brian has been the digital strategist for the 34th and 35th Annual Razzie Awards! Brian Rodda produced and hosted two shows on YouTube in 2014: Tailor Made with Brian Rodda and Digital Natives: Content Creation’s Front Line with over 80,000 views combined on YouTube. When not working with clients, hosting or producing, Brian can be found hiking Runyon Canyon, and exploring new cooking recipes with the exotic south American grain, Quinoa.      Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Internet TV is not “TV light”, in fact it’s not TV at all. It’s a completely different sandbox than TV and while many of the rules of the game are the same, there are distinctly different rules you must know before you break them. In this informative and entertaining seminar, Digital Strategist and Web Series Launch Expert, Brian Rodda outlines the Top 5 things to consider while in pre-production for your digital series. Items to be discussed are: Appropriate length and form specific to different video distribution platforms (Youtube vs. Vimeo vs. Netlfix, etc…) casting/working with a Digital Influencer, expanding your world with Ancillary Content, Marketing Budgets, securing social media real estate and so much more!

To read the Television Academy's interview with Brian click here!

What You'll Learn

  • Appropriate length and form of popular digital series
  • Why internet tv is not “tv light”
  • Working with digital influencers
  • How to cast digital influencers
  • Creating second-screen, vlog, and other ancillary content
  • Launching independently (YouTube) vs pitching/selling to a SVOD service (Netflix)
  • Creating a marketing budget
  • Creating a social media calendar
  • Personal branding vs. branding your series
  • Securing social media real estate
  • Q&A with Brian!

About Your Instructor

Brian Rodda has vast experience in viral marketing and has worked passionately in YouTube Strategy and Social Media strategy since 2007. He is a founding member of an aggregator for WGA written web series, and took that experience to found Brian Rodda Consulting in 2011. Brian has worked on promoting numerous notable digital series, including: Husbands (31,143 Subscribers, 2,145,151 views on Youtube) the web’s first marriage-equality comedy, Squaresville (31,401 Subscribers, 1,772,230 views on Youtube) and Whole Day Down ( Starring Willie Garson, Successful 40K+ Kickstarter campaign). Additionally, Brian has consulted with over 60 content creators to promote and create thriving communities for their properties, including Tello Films and Croissant Man (Vimeo Staff Pick). For the past two years, Brian has been the digital strategist for the 34th and 35th Annual Razzie Awards! Brian Rodda produced and hosted two shows on YouTube in 2014: Tailor Made with Brian Rodda and Digital Natives: Content Creation’s Front Line with over 80,000 views combined on YouTube. When not working with clients, hosting or producing, Brian can be found hiking Runyon Canyon, and exploring new cooking recipes with the exotic south American grain, Quinoa. 
 
 

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

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He’s prepared to share what he knows with the Stage 32 community. Eric will teach you invaluable strategies to help you move through the inevitable difficult stages of your documentary editing journey and to stay on track when the going gets tough and all seems lost. He will begin by going over what makes a good documentary story in general, including beginnings, middles, and ends, arcs, stakes, and “releasing power”. He’ll then discuss how best to approach your own footage and determining if you have a story. He’ll explain differentiating between the footage and the story in your head, how to craft an outline, and create a reckoning with beats. He will also teach you what selects are and why they can make all the difference. Next Eric will give you tips on how to approach the initial assembly edit, where to start, how to stay motivated, how to avoid “the music trap” and the best way to start linking your scenes together. 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