What Gets You Noticed? Essential Bio Writing for Creatives

Essential Bio Writing for Creatives
Hosted by Claire Winters

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This Next Level Education webinar has a 93% user satisfaction rate.

Claire Winters

Webinar hosted by: Claire Winters

Actor, Acting Teacher, Writer and Editor

Claire Winters has spent the last fifteen years working as an actor, film and acting teacher, and writer/editor. In each incarnation, her mission has been to create and share deeply personal and entertaining stories. Her background as both a performer and writer gives her a unique understanding of how one's story and the performance of it - whether in person or on the page - best work together. On screen she's appeared on The Mentalist, The Bold and The Beautiful, As the World Turns and HBO's Empire Falls, among others, and has acted on stage in New York and in regional theaters throughout the US. Her cultural and personal essays have appeared on Elle.com, Medium.com's Human Parts, and The Liberty Project. Claire taught acting and filmmaking at The Lee Strasberg Institute in New York has led workshops on social media for artists, bio writing and interview skills at The SAG-AFTRA Conservatory and SAG Foundation. In addition to her creative work, she's a committed advocate for the arts community. As a charter member of SAG-AFTRA's NextGenPerformers Committee, she helped educate young performers about the benefits of guild membership and served as a delegate at the 2015 SAG-AFTRA Convention. She co-founded and edited the influential acting website BrainsofMinerva.com, which Backstage Magazine called "the spirit of helping others to find grace in a pressure-filled business." Claire is a graduate of The MFA in Acting Program at American Conservatory Theater and The Actors Fund Teaching Artist Institute and a member of Actors Equity and SAG-AFTRA. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Learn directly from Claire Winters has spent the last fifteen years working as an actor, film and acting teacher, and writer/editor.

Testimonials:

"Thank you for challenging me to find the best in myself to present to industry professionals. I appreciate your encouragement to embrace all dimensions of myself in how I communicate. It was a pleasure to take your class." - Nikki Jacobs, Actor

"It’s not just her writing skill that made working with Claire such a great experience (though she has that in spades), but her insightful questions really got at the heart of what I wanted people to feel when reading my bio. Her knowledge of the entertainment industry also meant that she curated which work experiences the bio highlighted in an effective way. I now have something that I’m proud to share." - Sarah Sido, Actor

Do you sit down to write your bio and become paralyzed with fear and second-guessing? Or do you wonder who that blow-hard is you've created staring back at you from the computer screen? As careers in the entertainment industry become ever-more entrepreneurial, it's essential for every creative to have a bio that presents her in her best light. Yet, unfortunately, many bios are too impersonal to make an impact, or too self-effacing to engender confidence, or so egocentric that they turn their readers off. How can you write about your career in a way that sparks interest and begins a professional relationship on the right foot?

In this Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, you'll be lead through exercises on how to tell the story of your career with creativity, intelligence, wit, and, most importantly, in your own distinct voice. Not only will you emerge with a framework for a bio you'll be proud to share, but you'll also have deeper self-respect and inspired ideas for your next steps. 

What You'll Learn

  • When to write your bio in the first person or third person (“I have appeared” vs. “John has appeared...”)
  • How to structure your bio to keep your reader's interest.
  • The three biggest bio mistakes and how to avoid them.
  • When should you include personal info and how much?
  • Which credits to highlight and how to write about them in a way that expresses your potential.
  • Which credits to leave out.
  • How much training should you include?
  • What is “editorializing” and why you should avoid it.
  • How to get into the best state of mind to write about your work.
  • How to write for your target audience and why it matters.
  • Recorded Q&A with Claire 

About Your Instructor

Claire Winters has spent the last fifteen years working as an actor, film and acting teacher, and writer/editor. In each incarnation, her mission has been to create and share deeply personal and entertaining stories. Her background as both a performer and writer gives her a unique understanding of how one's story and the performance of it - whether in person or on the page - best work together.

On screen she's appeared on The Mentalist, The Bold and The Beautiful, As the World Turns and HBO's Empire Falls, among others, and has acted on stage in New York and in regional theaters throughout the US. Her cultural and personal essays have appeared on Elle.com, Medium.com's Human Parts, and The Liberty Project. Claire taught acting and filmmaking at The Lee Strasberg Institute in New York has led workshops on social media for artists, bio writing and interview skills at The SAG-AFTRA Conservatory and SAG Foundation.

In addition to her creative work, she's a committed advocate for the arts community. As a charter member of SAG-AFTRA's NextGenPerformers Committee, she helped educate young performers about the benefits of guild membership and served as a delegate at the 2015 SAG-AFTRA Convention. She co-founded and edited the influential acting website BrainsofMinerva.com, which Backstage Magazine called "the spirit of helping others to find grace in a pressure-filled business." Claire is a graduate of The MFA in Acting Program at American Conservatory Theater and The Actors Fund Teaching Artist Institute and a member of Actors Equity and SAG-AFTRA.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Testimonials

"From the moment we began our work together, I found Claire to be an exceptional listener, deeply insightful and someone who truly delivers excellence. I felt seen and known through her words. Though I am a writer, it was through the bio she wrote for me that I fully saw myself and understood the big picture of what I offer. Working with Claire is a beautiful, collaborative process. She invites and encourages all feed back. I thought her first draft was amazing but was so moved by how she refined and strengthened the second draft by leaps and bounds. She out did herself. Work with Claire. She is excellence and artistry embodied." - Heidi Rose Robbins, Author & Speaker

"It’s not just her writing skill that made working with Claire such a great experience (though she has that in spades), but her insightful questions really got at the heart of what I wanted people to feel when reading my bio. Her knowledge of the entertainment industry also meant that she curated which work experiences the bio highlighted in an effective way. I now have something that I’m proud to share." - Sarah Sido, Actor

"What I loved about the process was that it forced me to really dig deep to find the answers to questions I hadn’t really thought about, but that are so important in the grand scheme of things. I knew going into the process from having taken Claire’s workshop that she would produce something good. What surprised me was her attention to detail, her genuine interest, and how pleasant she is to work with. It really was a fun experience, and in the end my bio wasn’t just good, it was great." - Neil Cox, Actor

"Thank you for challenging me to find the best in myself to present to industry professionals. I appreciate your encouragement to embrace all dimensions of myself in how I communicate. It was a pleasure to take your class." - Nikki Jacobs, Actor

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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