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Directors: How to Get Believable Performances from Actors

Taught by Peter D. Marshall

$279

On Demand Class - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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Class hosted by: Peter D. Marshall

Director and Film Directing Coach

About the Your Instructor, Peter Marshall: Peter has directed over 30 episodes of Television Drama such as John Woo's Once a Thief, Wiseguy, 21 Jumpstreet, Neon Rider, The Black Stallion, Scene of the Crime, Big Wolf on Campus and Largo Winch. As a First Assistant Director, Peter has worked on over 12 Features (including Dawn of the Dead, The Butterfly Effect, Happy Gilmore, The Fly II); 16 Television Movies; 8 Television Series; and over 20 Commercials. He has written, directed or produced over 50 hours of documentary and educational programs and his documentaries and dramas have won, or been nominated for, 14 International film awards. Peter has worked for directors such as John Woo, Zack Snyder, Phillip Noyce, Ed Zwick, John Badham, Roger Vadim, Dennis Dugan, Anne Wheeler, Bobby Roth and Kim Manners. He has also worked with actors such as Peter O'Toole, Kevin Spacey, Morgan Freeman, John Travolta, Kathy Bates, Michelle Pfiefer, Marcia Gaye Harden, Madeleine Stowe, Mel Gibson, Ashton Kutcher, Goldie Hawn, Judy Davis, Halle Berry and Adam Sandler. Full Bio »

Summary

Back by popular demand! 4 part class taught by Peter Marshall, Director and Film Directing Coach with over 40 years of experience including 12 features, 16 TV movies, 8 TV series, over 30 episodes of TV drama, 50 hours of documentary and educational programming, and over 20 commercials!

THIS 4-PART CLASS IS AVAILABLE ON DEMAND!

The film director’s working relationship with an actor starts in the first casting session, continues through the various rehearsal stages, onto the set and ends in the ADR session. A good performance from an actor happens when both the inner and outer self are honestly portrayed. And to play a character truthfully, good actors need to surrender to feelings and impulses so they can perform organically or "in-the-moment."

Most trained actors begin by trusting the director, but if you can’t direct actors in a language they understand, you may have a difficult time getting actors to trust you. And if actors don’t trust you, you will have a difficult time blocking them on set and getting layered performances from them.

Stage 32 is excited to bring you the previously-recorded 4 part class: How to Get Believable Performances from Actors taught by Peter D. Marshall. The first webinar Peter did for Stage 32 was one of the highest attended webinars in Stage 32's history (Preproduction: The Film Director's Process of Discovery), and we've brought Peter back by popular demand to teach you how directors can build a relationship built on trust with actors by creating a safe place for them to perform.

Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class.
Although Peter is no longer distributing or reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all listeners to participate!

What You'll Learn

Part 1 - Understanding Human Behavior

Films directors must observe people going about their daily lives so you can discover what motivates people to take action – what makes people tick? Peter also goes over why you must understand human emotions and feelings to help actors achieve organic and believable performances – from the first audition to rehearsals to shooting on the set.

Part 2 - Script Analysis: The 9 Step Scene Breakdown Process

Peter explores the main strategies of proper script analysis you can use to help actors achieve the performance you desire. Peter runs through why good directors focus on directing the subtext, and how to apply the fundamentals of the “9 Part Scene Breakdown Process”.

Part 3 - Directing Actors in Prep

Working with experienced actors can be both intimidating and frustrating. Peter gives an in-depth look into what you need to speak the actor's language, including specific words and phrases. Peter also identifies the top 3 qualities you should look for in casting.

Part 4 - Directing Actors on Set

Peter covers how to reveal a character's thoughts or emotions through actions as well as the physical movement of actors relative to the position of the camera. Peter explores the “10 Step Actor/Director Blocking Process” including key blocking frames and other proven blocking tools and strategies.

About Your Instructor

About the Your Instructor, Peter Marshall:

Peter has directed over 30 episodes of Television Drama such as John Woo's Once a Thief, Wiseguy, 21 Jumpstreet, Neon Rider, The Black Stallion, Scene of the Crime, Big Wolf on Campus and Largo Winch.

As a First Assistant Director, Peter has worked on over 12 Features (including Dawn of the Dead, The Butterfly Effect, Happy Gilmore, The Fly II); 16 Television Movies; 8 Television Series; and over 20 Commercials. He has written, directed or produced over 50 hours of documentary and educational programs and his documentaries and dramas have won, or been nominated for, 14 International film awards.

Peter has worked for directors such as John Woo, Zack Snyder, Phillip Noyce, Ed Zwick, John Badham, Roger Vadim, Dennis Dugan, Anne Wheeler, Bobby Roth and Kim Manners. He has also worked with actors such as Peter O'Toole, Kevin Spacey, Morgan Freeman, John Travolta, Kathy Bates, Michelle Pfiefer, Marcia Gaye Harden, Madeleine Stowe, Mel Gibson, Ashton Kutcher, Goldie Hawn, Judy Davis, Halle Berry and Adam Sandler.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 2 to 4 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you cannot attend a live class and purchase an On-Demand class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the class afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand class, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Testimonials

Testimonials:

I really enjoyed the webinar. I liked the fact that the density of material was rich enough I was always busy taking notes. Thanks for covering the artistic and the logistic side of directing. - Brad Leech

Hey Stage 32, I wanted to thank you and Peter Marshall for such an enlightening class. I have so many notes and as a new Director I have to say I feel a bit more relaxed, knowing what steps I need to take to be more prepared for a shoot. Peter is so generous with his knowledge. I have his Directors class downloaded and I'm excited to view it. - Diane Lansing

First want to say I loved it, and encourage more. I am a new-comer to Stage 32, and came because of a notice from Mr. Marshall's website. I have purchased his directing class. I look forward to more! - Jeff Holt

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Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 5 out of 5

  • Very helpful, in depth and extremely well-structured.

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