How to Write Compelling & Authentic Dialogue: Make Your Dialogue Pop

Taught by Jared Iacino

$99 $249

On Demand Class - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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This Next Level Education class has a 92% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Jared Iacino

Vice President of Film & TV Development at Panay Films

About Your Instructor, Jared Iacino: Jared Iacino is the VP of Film and TV Development for Panay Films, a film and television production company whose credits include CHIPS (2017) directed by Dax Shepherd starring Michael Pena and Kristen Bell, Masterminds (2016) directed by Jared Hess, starring Kristen Wiig and Owen Wilson, staring Michael Pena and  Wedding Crashers (2005) starring Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson, Van Wilder (2002) starring Ryan Reynolds and Serendipity (2001) starring John Cusack and Kate Beckinsale. In his time at Panay Films, Jared has been involved with the development and production of many projects including the independent comedy Hit & Run (2012) starring Kristen Bell, Dax Shepard, and Bradley Cooper, as well as the MGM comedy Hot Tub Time Machine 2 starring Craig Robinson, Rob Corddry, Clark Duke and Adam Scott, and the family adventure Echo (Relativity Media) for which Jared also served as an associate producer. Prior to his time at Panay Films, Jared worked in development on critically acclaimed film and television projects including: The Devil Wears Prada (2006), Juno (2007), Hairspray (2007), The Bucket List (2007), A Raisin in the Sun (2008), The Proposal (2009), and The Muppets (2011). Full Bio »

To see a video sample of the class, see below!

4 part class taught by Jared Iacino, who has worked in development and production for Walt Disney Studios, Red Wagon Entertainment, Storyline Entertainment, Fox Studios, and is currently the VP of Film & TV Development for Panay Films! Dialogue can be one of the most challenging elements for a screenwriter. Mastering efficient dialogue in a 110 page screenplay is a tough skill to master. Dialogue has to be natural, distinct, authentic and layered. Each character's voice has to stand out, incorporate their characteristics and be layered with subtext. So, how do you learn to say a lot by saying a little? How do uncover the story without too much exposition? How do you communicate your point while capturing the complexity of the story layers? It's not easy and it takes a lot of work. Writers that have mastered the art of dialogue catch an executive's attention every time.

Stage 32 Happy Writers is excited to bring you the previously-recorded 4 part class: How to Write Compelling and Authentic Dialogue, taught by Jared Iacino, VP of Film and TV Development for Panay Films. In detail, you will learn character, voice, tone and objectivity from an executive currently working in the industry.

Here's a sample of what to expect in this exciting Next Level Class:

Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class.
Although Jared is no longer reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all listeners to participate

 


Summary:

Part 1 - Character

Jared gives an overview of the elements that make for engaging and natural dialogue, using practical, real-world examples demonstrating how the voice of a screenplay can make your project competitive in the marketplace. He also reveals the “one true secret” behind some of the best dialogue ever written.

Part 2 - Environment

Jared leads a discussion on how to cultivate the best environment for great dialogue to grow. He also discusses the practical side of writing dialogue for a specific audience of genre.

Part 3 - Voice

Jared covers how to find a character's voice when writing dialogue, and how to successfully layer subtext into your scenes. Part 3 ends with a discussion on the Do's and Dont's of writing great dialogue.

Part 4 - Objectivity

The last part of this class covers common mistakes writers make when writing dialogue for voice overs. Jared reveals the single tool that is in every great writers' toolbox, and lastly he gives insight into what producers and executives look for when evaluating the voice of a screenplay.


About Your Instructor:

About Your Instructor, Jared Iacino:

Jared Iacino is the VP of Film and TV Development for Panay Films, a film and television production company whose credits include CHIPS (2017) directed by Dax Shepherd starring Michael Pena and Kristen Bell, Masterminds (2016) directed by Jared Hess, starring Kristen Wiig and Owen Wilson, staring Michael Pena and  Wedding Crashers (2005) starring Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson, Van Wilder (2002) starring Ryan Reynolds and Serendipity (2001) starring John Cusack and Kate Beckinsale.

In his time at Panay Films, Jared has been involved with the development and production of many projects including the independent comedy Hit & Run (2012) starring Kristen Bell, Dax Shepard, and Bradley Cooper, as well as the MGM comedy Hot Tub Time Machine 2 starring Craig Robinson, Rob Corddry, Clark Duke and Adam Scott, and the family adventure Echo (Relativity Media) for which Jared also served as an associate producer.

Prior to his time at Panay Films, Jared worked in development on critically acclaimed film and television projects including: The Devil Wears Prada (2006), Juno (2007), Hairspray (2007), The Bucket List (2007), A Raisin in the Sun (2008), The Proposal (2009), and The Muppets (2011).


Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 2 to 4 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you cannot attend a live class and purchase an On-Demand class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the class afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand class, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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