An Indie Producer's Guide on How to Keep a Project on Track Through Production

Hosted by Luke Daniels

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Luke Daniels

Webinar hosted by: Luke Daniels

Executive in Charge of Production at Tunnel

Luke Daniels is the Executive in Charge of Production for Tunnel. In his career in entertainment, which has spanned nearly two decades, Luke has produced over 60 feature films (8 in 2019 alone), including the Cannes, Sundance, Tribeca and TIFF Official Selections. His produced film slate ranges from micro-budget (under $1M), to low budget ($1M-$5M), to mid budget ($15M-$20M). Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

After producing over 60 films for nearly two decades, your host Luke Daniels has seen it all. He's worked on films with directors like Kevin Smith and James Franco and talent like Riley Keough, Jean Claude Van Damme, Luke Wilson, Topher Grace and more. Through it all, he's learned tricks as an independent producer that can help keep your production on track when there are a lot of moving elements to make it all come together. In this exclusive Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, Luke will go over the things he's learned through the years to help you with your own productions. 

 

What You'll Learn

Pre-Production

  • How to creatively put financing together
  • The basic steps to putting a project together smartly
  • How to hold key elements in place and what to do if you lose an actor/director
  • How to be nimble during production/prep
  • What to do when you lose a location before filming starts

Production

  • How to manage top talent
  • What to do if you have difficulties with talent
  • How to manage a director/respecting the vision while also creatively collaborating as a producer
  • What to do when you aren’t bonded and you go over budget
  • What to do when you get hit with unexpected fines

Q&A with Luke

About Your Instructor

Luke Daniels is the Executive in Charge of Production for Tunnel. In his career in entertainment, which has spanned nearly two decades, Luke has produced over 60 feature films (8 in 2019 alone), including the Cannes, Sundance, Tribeca and TIFF Official Selections.

His produced film slate ranges from micro-budget (under $1M), to low budget ($1M-$5M), to mid budget ($15M-$20M).

FAQs

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A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

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Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

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