How to Hire Experienced Crew for Your Micro-Budget Feature Film on the Cheap

Hosted by Barry Andersson

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Barry Andersson

Webinar hosted by: Barry Andersson

Director & Cinematographer

Barry Andersson is an award-winning director and cinematographer. He has directed 5 feature films and has had his features theatrically released in theaters with his latest film distributed by Lionsgate. Barry's has also shot several television pilots, acclaimed short films, numerous commercials, and countless commercials and corporate videos. As if that wasn't enough, Barry is also the author of the hugely successful and revered DSLR Filmmakers Handbook. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

So you want to shoot a micro-budget film. You've got your idea. You're excited as hell. You can't wait to get going. There's just one problem. You have little to no money, need to shoot this film on the cheap, and you can't do it without an experienced crew. So how can you get quality, talented people to work for you for little to no money? It happens every day. If you know how to navigate.
 
The old saying goes, a filmmaker is only as good as his or her crew. Making sure that everything is buttoned up on set, from your script supervisor to your sound engineer to your DP and gaffer, the more quality you throw at your film in pre-production and during production, the less headaches and "let's try to fix it in post" problems (which are also painfully expensive) you'll face in post-production. The thing is, regardless of your budget, and in this case we're talking ultra low to $250,000, you can find passionate, creative, and qualified people to work for you well below their normal rate.
 
Barry Andersson is an award-winning director and cinematographer. He has directed 5 feature films (time and time again with some of the best crews imaginable) and has had his features theatrically released in theaters with his latest film distributed by Lionsgate. Barry's has also shot several television pilots, acclaimed short films, numerous commercials, and countless commercials and corporate videos. As if that wasn't enough, Barry is also the author of the hugely successful and revered DSLR Filmmakers Handbook.
 
Barry will teach you how to secure top level, Hollywood quality, crew members for cheap no matter where you live in the world. He will instill in you the confidence to identify and then go in for the proper "ask". He will show you why sometimes a positive and visionary attitude is everything. He will even teach you how to be flexible with your story and locations in an effort to give yourself the best chance of finding and securing a crew that can take your film from OK to masterpiece.
 
 
Barry is an excellent teacher. He never fails to inspire and make you understand that what you always believed to be impossible, or at least ridiculously daunting, is not only possible, but absolutely attainable if you follow his methods. I wouldn't be where I'm at without him.
 
- Julia V.

What You'll Learn

  • Understanding How to Put Together and Get the Right Team for Your Production when Working Microbudget
    • Questions you need to honestly ask yourself about your project
    • Questions you need to ask yourself about the crew you want to hire
    • Case study of a $19,000 project 
  • How to Secure Top Level Professional Crew for Cheap Even if You Don't Live in Hollywood
    • 3 key types of people to approach
    • Tips on how you approach people who would normally just say "no" based on what you are paying
    • Tips on how to go in for the "ask" with them 
    • Smaller crews vs. one man band productions - which is better?
  • Case Studies of 3 Projects Under $250,000 and How They Were Crewed Up with Professionals
    • Case study on Barry's film Relentless (a $50,000 production)
    • Case study of The Lumber Baron  (a $250,000 production)
    • Case study of The Soviet Sleet Experiment (under $200,000 production)
  •  How to Pitch Your Project with Passion 
    • Tips on how to do this and what you can gain from it 
  • Q&A with Barry!

About Your Instructor

Barry Andersson is an award-winning director and cinematographer. He has directed 5 feature films and has had his features theatrically released in theaters with his latest film distributed by Lionsgate. Barry's has also shot several television pilots, acclaimed short films, numerous commercials, and countless commercials and corporate videos. As if that wasn't enough, Barry is also the author of the hugely successful and revered DSLR Filmmakers Handbook.

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Reviews Average Rating: 5 out of 5

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