How to Shoot in VR/360: From Script to Shooting

Hosted by Zeke Thomas

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This Next Level Education webinar has a 90% user satisfaction rate.

Zeke Thomas

Webinar hosted by: Zeke Thomas

EP- Clients: Paramount, Legendary, Outside TV, YouTube & More at Ego 360

Zeke Thomas is an Executive Producer at Ego 360, a filmmaker, and on-camera talent with over a decade of experience in the entertainment and advertising industries. You may recognize him from ad campaigns for Fortune 500 companies, sketches on Conan, and viral videos that top over 100 MM views across Youtube and Facebook. At Ego 360 he specializes in immersive storytelling in spherical environments in narrative, branded, and unscripted. Founded in February of this year, Ego 360 has already amassed an impressive client list including: Legendary Pictures, Nerdist Industries, VidCon, Youtube, Outside TV, and Paramount Pictures just to name a few. Prior to his work at Ego 360, Zeke served as creative producer and interim creative director for Defy Media's Break Youtube channel. In addition to his duties at Ego 360, he also serves as a Consulting Producer at BlackboxTV Studios where he wrote and produced a zombie musical comedy in association with Robert Kirkman's Skybound Entertainment. He's currently in writing and producing season one of Get Jacked! for Clevver/DEFY which combines pop culture and fitness based comedy. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Virtual Reality: The Next Frontier of Filmmaking - You've probably heard this mantra from anyone who's ever picked up a VR headset and they aren't necessarily wrong. New forms of media come along once every couple of decades and VR is the latest form to take shape since the advent of online video. If you're interested in learning what goes into the production of a spherical capture and VR you're in the right place!

In this Stage 32 Webinar, Zeke Thomas, an executive producer at Ego 360 (clients include: Legendary Pictures, Nerdist Industries, VidCon, Youtube, Outside TV, and Paramount Pictures) will provide an overview of best practices for shooting a 360 video and spherical capture from concept to execution. He will cover the importance of storytelling in immersive environments, how your location will inform your production workflow, and the best way for consumers to interact with your content.

Virtual Reality/spherical capture is a relatively new form of media that is being adopted by consumers at an incredible rate. If you're interested in throwing your hat in the ring, take advantage of Zeke's knowledge to learn about what works and what doesn't for immersive experiences.

As an executive producer at Ego 360 and VR your host, Zeke has guided, budgeted, and executed a multitude of projects in immersive storytelling as well as managed client/studio relationships. He has been a filmmaker and storyteller in the digital space since 2007 and continues to produce in both framed and immersive environments.

What You'll Learn

  • Overview: What is VR and How do we capture it?
  • What is the difference between VR vs 360 spherical capture?
  • The VR landscape
    • How people consume your work?
    • Uses for VR in everyday life (Commercial, Science, Training, Tourism)
    • Cinematic VR narrative = experiences
  • Why should we film a VR piece vs a regular framed piece?
  • What works vs what doesn't?
    • Examples: The Gold Standard in VR - Help
    • Current smaller pieces - Exorcist, Don't Breathe
  • Empathy vs agency
  • What makes good content?
  • Film school rules = worthless in VR
  • The Importance of Locations
  • Production - How do I shoot my crazy idea?
    • How creativity will inform your production techniques?
    • Who is this for and where will it live?
    • Types of rigs you have access to.
    • Lens and stitches
    • Camera technique
  •  Post-Production
    • Transitions/Cuts
    • Plug-ins
  • An in-depth Q&A with Zeke Thomas!

About Your Instructor

Zeke Thomas is an Executive Producer at Ego 360, a filmmaker, and on-camera talent with over a decade of experience in the entertainment and advertising industries. You may recognize him from ad campaigns for Fortune 500 companies, sketches on Conan, and viral videos that top over 100 MM views across Youtube and Facebook.

At Ego 360 he specializes in immersive storytelling in spherical environments in narrative, branded, and unscripted.

Founded in February of this year, Ego 360 has already amassed an impressive client list including: Legendary Pictures, Nerdist Industries, VidCon, Youtube, Outside TV, and Paramount Pictures just to name a few. Prior to his work at Ego 360, Zeke served as creative producer and interim creative director for Defy Media's Break Youtube channel.

In addition to his duties at Ego 360, he also serves as a Consulting Producer at BlackboxTV Studios where he wrote and produced a zombie musical comedy in association with Robert Kirkman's Skybound Entertainment.

He's currently in writing and producing season one of Get Jacked! for Clevver/DEFY which combines pop culture and fitness based comedy.

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Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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