How to Shoot a Feature Film in 14 Days for $75,000 and Be Profitable

Hosted by Zack Ward

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Zack Ward

Webinar hosted by: Zack Ward

Actor, Director, Screenwriter and Producer

Zack Ward an actor, director, screenwriter and producer with 37 years in the industry. Launching his career with the role of Scut Farkus in the classic A Christmas Story, Zack's career spans the gamut of genres, from blockbusters like Transformers and Resident Evil: Apocalypse to edgy art films such as Trade and Oscar Winner Almost Famous to the slapstick action of Postal and the dark comedy cult hit Titus. Zack continues using his years of experience behind the camera having written, produced and directed feature films. Don’t Blink released in September 2014, starring Brian Austin Green and Mena Suvari was Zack’s first production. In 2015 he wrote and produced two features, acting in both and directing one. Restoration was his feature directorial debut released May 2016. The second feature, Bethany, will be released September 2016. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

We are thrilled to bring in veteran producer, director, screenwriter, and actor Zack Ward. Zack began his career with his role as Scut Farkus in A Christmas Story, and has since spent more than three decades acting in over 100 films. All of his years on set have allowed him to learn the elements of making a film inside and out. As a result, over the last several years Zack has gone on to produce 3 films and directed 1 feature film. His film Restoration, which he wrote, directed, acted and produced in is currently available on Amazon, iTunes, Google Play, Hulu, Ubiquity and coming this month on Redbox. This micro-budget film was made for only $75,000, was shot in 14 days - and - here's the kicker - was making money before he ever yelled "ACTION!"

Now, exclusively for Stage 32 Next Level Education Zack is going to take you through the processes and procedures he's learned to bring his latest feature film in on time, on budget and profitable.

What You'll Learn

INDIE FILM GUIDELINES

  • The 4 “P’s” – what every filmmaker needs to live by to make a successful indie film. You will learn them in the webinar.

THE TRIANGLE & THE TRINITY

  • The 3 “P’s” hold the production together– you will learn them in the webinar

MONEY

  • We will go over two different scenarios – 1) if you have the money and 2) if you don’t have the money.

SCRIPT

  • We will go over two different scenarios – 1) if you have the script and 2) if you don’t have the script.

LEGAL

  • We will go over the various roles involved with legal, and talk about LLCs, standards (or lack thereof) and how to protect yourself.

READY TO ROCK!

  • We will go over all things prep - table reading, script rewrites, location scouting, hiring cast & crew and everything that goes along with this process.

HARD PREP TO PRODUCTION

  • We will go over everything from production partner expectations, hiring decisions and I will offer TONS of advice on being on set – what you should do, how you should do it and who should be there. You’ll walk away armed with comprehensive knowledge to get it done. And, we’ll talk about everyone’s favorite part – THE WRAP!

POST

  • Often overlooked, post is so important. We’ll go over your key crew during post and how to deliver a good film and how to close out the “business” part of your paperwork. We’ll talk about delivering your film to a distributor and your social media strategy.

DISTRIBUTION DEAL

  • We will go over distribution deals and everything I’ve learned doing my films.

About Your Instructor

Zack Ward an actor, director, screenwriter and producer with 37 years in the industry. Launching his career with the role of Scut Farkus in the classic A Christmas Story, Zack's career spans the gamut of genres, from blockbusters like Transformers and Resident Evil: Apocalypse to edgy art films such as Trade and Oscar Winner Almost Famous to the slapstick action of Postal and the dark comedy cult hit Titus.

Zack continues using his years of experience behind the camera having written, produced and directed feature films. Don’t Blink released in September 2014, starring Brian Austin Green and Mena Suvari was Zack’s first production. In 2015 he wrote and produced two features, acting in both and directing one. Restoration was his feature directorial debut released May 2016. The second feature, Bethany, will be released September 2016.

FAQs

What is the format of a webinar?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Testimonials

"Zack was great and was enthusiastic about sharing the entire content." -Jonah A.

"Zack was great and his info very helpful." -Maurice B.

"Zach was phenomenal. This was such rich information. He is the real deal." -Debra S.

"He has been very helpful to the point!" -Merve T.

"Best, most practically informative webinar I have taken on Stage 32. So good to have someone walk through the process giving so much valuable insights. Good to hear Zack talk about the importance of looking at a project from the business side. Thought this was most informative webinar yet. Zack was fantastic in detailing through various stages of film little things that had to be done." -Andy S.

"This was easily one of the most approachable How To sessions I've seen here. Advice given was rooted, did not include things only obtainable from within the system or resources that are unreasonable or unmanageable for starting/indie filmmakers." -Shane Wheeler

"Zack was fantastic. Honest, open, helpful, informative. Loved the content and Zack!" -Dave P.

 

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

  • Zack, great two part session! Really wanted to hear the distribution more!! You went out in 10 cities in a day/date on Restoration, what did that cost you? QWhat did you make on your VOD release since you had a premium (theater) release? You sold at Walmart, how many copies did you move and any chargebacks? How many Redbox copies did you sell? Where do you think your Netflix numbers will end up? I know it's too late but us indie producers are needing these numbers.
  • Really enjoyed this webinar. Learned a great deal from Zack and LOVED the case studies, examples, numbers and insight he provided. It helps that he's very comfortable talking on camera (skype) and has a tremendous amount of experience in front of and behind the camera. Like most of these 90 minute (give or take) webinars, you can only get into so much detail and tips/suggestions (given the short amount of time), but Zack did a great job of walking us through how he made the film and was profitable. Highly recommend to any new (or new'ish filmmakers out there)!
  • He had so much info that he only finished half of his notes. So that was disappointing. But the notes that he did give were amazing and well worth the price. Looking forward to his 2nd webinar to finish his notes!
  • Zack, though he didn't finish his notes, talked to us like we were drinking buddies, not like he was trying to teach. His enthusiasm about the topic was refreshing.

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