The Ins and Outs of Becoming a Showrunner for Unscripted TV

Hosted by Adam Matalon

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Adam Matalon

Webinar hosted by: Adam Matalon

Award-winning Executive Producer, Showrunner, Creator and Director at Chatsby Films Inc.

Adam is an award-winning executive producer, show runner, director and creator. Born in NYC and raised in London, he is a dual national and was born into a theatrical family. He spent his formative years as a working actor in New York and London’s West End in numerous productions and this set the stage for his strong storytelling instincts This performance background combined with his photography degree and a strong technical knowledge of all production crafts, has allowed him to develop a formidable arsenal of production and creative skills. Moving into TV and film he has done almost everybody’s job except PA. At home in both scripted and unscripted arenas TV Adam has executive produced scripted and unscripted programming in a variety of genres delivering programming for most of the major networks and cable broadcasters. He recently produced the 14 part scripted digital series Tainted Dreams nominated for a 2014 digital Emmy and in 2015 he executive produced and helped launch two successful brands Donnie Loves Jenny starring Donnie Wahlberg and Jenny McCarthy, and a new African American plastic surgery format for Lifetime called Atlanta Plastic. 2016 marks the launch of a new personal production shingle, work on a variety of unscripted development and alongside Aether Pictures, producing a new feature film about the real life story of a transgender opera singer. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Learn directly from Adam Matalon, award winning executive producer, show runner, director and creator who's worked on over 20 projects on cable and network television.

The unscripted and reality genres are becoming more and more fragmented and producers are forced into more and more niche areas of expertise. This is creating a vacuum in which producers wanting to step into showrunner roles are unable to do so because they lack the overview expertise. In this Next Level Webinar, Adam Matalon challenges that notion and investigates the role of the showrunner in today's current climate of television.

As more and more networks and production companies are struggling with staffing their leader, there are fewer and fewer opportunities. We will discuss the reasons for this and how storytellers, producers, writers, and directors can best prepare themselves for leadership roles in the fast evolving television and digital space. Adam will break down the process of taking a project from presentation, through production and on to delivery to the network; something that is vital for all aspiring showrunners both in the reality and unscripted space as well as a scripted space.

Adam will also touch on the best ways for building an environment that will make you more employable, how ‘storytelling’ is utilized in a reality show and the various documents needed to accomplish the task of getting the 'greenlight.' 

This webinar includes a packet of supplemental materials such as templates and example production documents!

What You'll Learn

  • How scripted and unscripted programming are very similar
  • Understanding the chain of command and avoid unnecessary confrontations
  • Day-to-day operational tasks and how to accomplish them
  • How to move a show forward after being greenlit
    • budgets, prepping each department, communication with networks, etc.
  • Taking an auteur's approach to reality; why a 'voice' is so important
  • Building your team and strong delegation techniques
  • Developing your personal management style
  • Proper communication with your team and the network
  • Understanding audience trends and long term needs of your project
  • Hidden tasks every showrunner ends up doing
  • Recorded, in-depth Q&A with Adam!

About Your Instructor

Adam is an award-winning executive producer, show runner, director and creator. Born in NYC and raised in London, he is a dual national and was born into a theatrical family. He spent his formative years as a working actor in New York and London’s West End in numerous productions and this set the stage for his strong storytelling instincts This performance background combined with his photography degree and a strong technical knowledge of all production crafts, has allowed him to develop a formidable arsenal of production and creative skills.

Moving into TV and film he has done almost everybody’s job except PA. At home in both scripted and unscripted arenas TV Adam has executive produced scripted and unscripted programming in a variety of genres delivering programming for most of the major networks and cable broadcasters. He recently produced the 14 part scripted digital series Tainted Dreams nominated for a 2014 digital Emmy and in 2015 he executive produced and helped launch two successful brands Donnie Loves Jenny starring Donnie Wahlberg and Jenny McCarthy, and a new African American plastic surgery format for Lifetime called Atlanta Plastic. 2016 marks the launch of a new personal production shingle, work on a variety of unscripted development and alongside Aether Pictures, producing a new feature film about the real life story of a transgender opera singer.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

  • Excellent view into the showrunner world!
  • Worth every penny and then some. An awesome soup-to-nuts breakdown of all things showrunner - articulate, real-life examples, downloadable & editable content, and just a kick-ass overview of what it takes to be the big cheese.
  • Adam knows his stuff. A lot of material to cover in a very short time. A good general overview.

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