The Breakdown Webcast: Dramatic Irony

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The Breakdown

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Isn't it ironic? In this Breakdown Webcast we discuss Dramatic Irony - when the audience knows more information about the circumstances the characters find themselves in than the characters do themselves. There are actually several different types of "irony" in storytelling and we will be looking at most of them during this packed hour. We will pay special attention to Dramatic Irony which can be used for dramatic, comedic, suspenseful or tragic effect. During this webcast we'll discuss different ways of utilizing dramatic irony and how it effects the emotional connection we have with our characters and the heightened tension and stakes it creates. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Isn't it ironic? In this Breakdown Webcast we discuss Dramatic Irony - when the audience knows more information about the circumstances the characters find themselves in than the characters do themselves. 

There are actually several different types of "irony" in storytelling and we will be looking at most of them during this packed hour. We will pay special attention to Dramatic Irony which can be used for dramatic, comedic, suspenseful or tragic effect. During this webcast we'll discuss different ways of utilizing dramatic irony and how it effects the emotional connection we have with our characters and the heightened tension and stakes it creates.

About Your Instructor

Isn't it ironic? In this Breakdown Webcast we discuss Dramatic Irony - when the audience knows more information about the circumstances the characters find themselves in than the characters do themselves.

There are actually several different types of "irony" in storytelling and we will be looking at most of them during this packed hour. We will pay special attention to Dramatic Irony which can be used for dramatic, comedic, suspenseful or tragic effect. During this webcast we'll discuss different ways of utilizing dramatic irony and how it effects the emotional connection we have with our characters and the heightened tension and stakes it creates.

Testimonials

"Thanks so much for this session. Very instructive." - Stephen P.

"What a great topic. Thank you for this, Jason!" - Kay R.

"This has been so instructive! I see now that I need to add some dramatic irony to my scripts to amp up the drama or comedy! Thanks, Jason!" - Martha C.

 

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