8 Week Intensive TV Drama Pilot Writing Lab

Taught by Morgan Long

$799

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Who Should Attend:

This lab is designed for beginner and intermediate screenwriters looking to build a pilot from scratch or expand on an existing idea. This is an intensive lab and will require full writing effort.

Stage 32 Next Level Education has a 97% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Morgan Long

Coordinator in TV Literary at "Big Six" Agency

Morgan Long is a Coordinator in the TV literary department at one of the "Big Six" agencies in Hollywood. Morgan has a passion for development and loves assisting writers and creatives achieve personal and professional success in the fast-paced agency world. A native Texan, Morgan got her start in television at Televisa USA. While at Televisa USA Morgan worked in scripted development, where she worked closely with Lionsgate on shows like Devious Maids and Chasing Life. After years with Televisa USA, she moved to the representation side of the industry at the Gersh Agency. She and her department represent TV writers, directors, and non-writing producers. Full Bio »

Summary

Learn directly from Morgan Long, TV Literary Department for a “Big Six” Agency

This lab is designed for beginner and intermediate screenwriters looking to build a pilot from scratch or expand on an existing idea.

With the TV market exploding right now, one of the most in demand formats is the 1-hour TV drama pilot. Many, if not all, managers and agents are looking for writers that can write in this space, and with more and more production companies heading into TV, knowing how to write a strong 1-hour TV drama pilot will give you a competitive advantage and help you find success as a TV writer!

Due to popular demand, Stage 32 is thrilled to bring back our 8 Week Intensive TV Drama Pilot Writing Lab taught by Morgan Long, a TV development coordinator at a “Big Six” Agency! This hands-on intensive lab will guide you through picking a concept, creating engaging characters, structuring and outlining your pilot and writing the first draft!

The main objective of this 8-week lab will be to have a first draft of your script. You will meet online with Morgan for 2 hours a week in a class setting, plus have phone consultations during some of the weeks when you don't have an online class. This will be accompanied by weekly homework assignments to guide you on your way to creating a marketable, unique pilot that will grab the industry's attention.

Payment plans are available - please contact julie@stage32.com for more information. 

This Lab is Limited to 20 People.

Please Note: Participating in this lab does not mean you are writing for or pitching to Morgan or her company. 

PRE-CLASS PREP - Read your syllabus and plan out your writing ideas. Begin to think about 1-2 ideas that might be a good idea for your drama pilot. Start to prepare for your pilot pitch.

What You'll Learn

WEEK #1 – Introduction, Pitch Docs, Bibles 

This week we will cover the syllabus, my background and experience, your general questions and your goals for this eight-week lab. We will discuss the types of drama pilots and how they differ from network to network. We will go over how to create effective loglines, pitch documents, and series bibles. The assignment for the week will be to create a pitch document and a series bible. I will provide well-known examples for reference.

WEEK #2 – Pilot Outline

This week we will break down pilot structure, plot and subplots. Pilot structure varies depending on the type of drama pilot (procedural or serial) and the network (broadcast, cable, streaming, digital, etc.) We will identify a target network for your story idea and structure the pilot accordingly. The assignment for the week is to complete a pilot outline.

WEEK #3 – Pilot Outline (One on One Consultations – No Online Class)

This week will consist of one-on-one consultations regarding pilot structure. Each writer will send me their pilot outline in advance and we will have a 10-minute call to discuss what works and what doesn’t. The assignment for the week is to address any notes given on the outline before proceeding with next week’s class.

WEEK #4– Scenes, Beats, Dialogue, Character

This week we will address the qualities of effective (and ineffective) scenes, story beats, and dialogue. We will also delve into character – what makes for strong characters and weak ones. This week we will assign partners. Each writer will read and provide feedback on his or her partner’s writing for the remainder of the lab, and visa versa. The assignment for the week will be to write three complete scenes from your outline: the teaser/opening scene, a scene with heavy dialogue, and a strong character scene.

WEEK #5– Acts 1 and 2

We will follow a traditional four-act structure for class purposes, but I will keep in mind the act structures each of you have chosen throughout. This week we will go over all the necessary story beats that exist in acts 1 and 2 of a drama pilot, including exposition, number of scenes per act, traditional page count, inciting incidents, acts 1 and 2 breaks, etc. The assignment this week will be to complete Acts 1 and 2 of your pilot.

WEEK #6– Acts 3 and 4 

Similarly to last week, we will cover the necessary story beats that traditionally exist in acts 3 and 4 of a drama pilot. If your pilot structure has five or even six acts, as some broadcast network shows do, there will be time at the end of class for further instruction on how to proceed. Your assigned partner will preferably have the same number of acts in his or her pilot. The assignment this week is to complete the first draft of the entire pilot.

WEEK #7–Consultation for Revision (No Online Class)

This week will consist of one-on-one consultations. Please turn your pilot in to me at least 24 hours before our scheduled call, and each writer will have a 10-minute call with me to go over notes. Your assignment this week is to address any notes.

WEEK #8– One-on-one Feedback and Polish (No Online Class)

This week will consist of 10-minute one-on-one phone calls as we had last week. Please submit your revised pilot to me at least 24 hours before our scheduled call. I will give final notes and talk next steps for your pilot.

About Your Instructor

Morgan Long is a Coordinator in the TV literary department at one of the "Big Six" agencies in Hollywood. Morgan has a passion for development and loves assisting writers and creatives achieve personal and professional success in the fast-paced agency world. A native Texan, Morgan got her start in television at Televisa USA. While at Televisa USA Morgan worked in scripted development, where she worked closely with Lionsgate on shows like Devious Maids and Chasing Life. After years with Televisa USA, she moved to the representation side of the industry at the Gersh Agency. She and her department represent TV writers, directors, and non-writing producers.

Schedule

Week 1 - June 25, 2016 - 11am-1pm
 
Week 2 - July 2, 2016 - 11am - 1pm
 
Week 3 - July 9, 2016 - No online class, one-on-one consultations
 
Week 4 - July 16, 2016 - 11am - 1pm
 
Week 5 - July 23, 2016 - 11am - 1pm
 
Week 6 - July 30, 2016 - 11am - 1pm
 
Week 7 - August 6, 2016 - No online class, one-on-one consultations
 
Week 8 - August 13, 2016 - No online class, one-on-one consultations

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 2 to 4 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you cannot attend a live class and purchase an On-Demand class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the class afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand class, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

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8 Week Intensive TV Drama Pilot Writing Lab

Learn directly from Morgan Long, TV Literary Department for a “Big Six” Agency This lab is designed for beginner and intermediate screenwriters looking to build a pilot from scratch or expand on an existing idea. With the TV market exploding right now, one of the most in demand formats is the 1-hour TV drama pilot. Many, if not all, managers and agents are looking for writers that can write in this space, and with more and more production companies heading into TV, knowing how to write a strong 1-hour TV drama pilot will give you a competitive advantage and help you find success as a TV writer! Due to popular demand, Stage 32 is thrilled to bring back our 8 Week Intensive TV Drama Pilot Writing Lab taught by Morgan Long, a TV development coordinator at a “Big Six” Agency! This hands-on intensive lab will guide you through picking a concept, creating engaging characters, structuring and outlining your pilot and writing the first draft! The main objective of this 8-week lab will be to have a first draft of your script. You will meet online with Morgan for 2 hours a week in a class setting, plus have phone consultations during some of the weeks when you don't have an online class. This will be accompanied by weekly homework assignments to guide you on your way to creating a marketable, unique pilot that will grab the industry's attention. Payment plans are available - please contact julie@stage32.com for more information.  This Lab is Limited to 20 People. Please Note: Participating in this lab does not mean you are writing for or pitching to Morgan or her company.  PRE-CLASS PREP - Read your syllabus and plan out your writing ideas. Begin to think about 1-2 ideas that might be a good idea for your drama pilot. Start to prepare for your pilot pitch.

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