Write Now Webinar -Writing Visually Complex Concepts or Action

Write Now Challenge
Hosted by The Write Now Challenge

N/A
You are not a VIP member

Only VIP members have access to this exclusive webinar library. Click here to subscribe to a VIP plan.

Stage 32 Next Level Education has a 97% user satisfaction rate.

The Write Now Challenge

Webinar hosted by: The Write Now Challenge

Jason Mirch is Stage 32's Director of Script Services and host of the Writers' Room. Outside of this role, he is a feature film, television, branded entertainment, and digital content producer and executive with over 15 years experience. Most recently, he produced a 3D animated feature film starring Jacob Tremblay, Christopher Lloyd, Mel Brooks, and Carol Kane. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

How can you write to make the complex understandable? How can you describe a set piece that is both inventive and relatable? That is the goal for this month's Write Now Challenge!

What You'll Learn

You'll learn how to write the complex and make it understandable.

About Your Instructor

Jason Mirch is Stage 32's Director of Script Services and host of the Writers' Room. Outside of this role, he is a feature film, television, branded entertainment, and digital content producer and executive with over 15 years experience. Most recently, he produced a 3D animated feature film starring Jacob Tremblay, Christopher Lloyd, Mel Brooks, and Carol Kane.

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

Other education that may be of interest to you:

Write Now Webcast - Describe Tools, Mechanisms, Machinerly or Complex Ideas

While the scene will be heavy with exposition, disguise the exposition in dialogue and conflict as much as possible. How does the character make the complex simple? What props does the person use? How does the character who receives the info react?

The Write Now Webcast: Breaking the 4th Wall

Using the principles learned in the Breakdown Webcast: Breaking the 4th Wall, this month members were challenged to write a short scene in which the character(s) break the fourth wall to drive the plot forward, reveal character and deliver exposition. As part of the webcast, Jason turns the microphone over to the writers to read their projects aloud for the other members in the group. 

The Write Now Webcast: Antihero Character Bios

Write Now Challenge: Antihero Character Bios, in which we will hear more about the characters you have created! This month you were challenged to write a character bio for an antihero of your creation. This is unlike any other challenge you've tackled here if you need any last minute inspiration, just revisit the Breakdown Webcast on antiheroes here! As part of this challenge, I will be turning the microphone over to you! If you have submitted your pages and would like to read them for the group, you are more than welcome.

The Write Now Challenge: Isn't it Ironic?

It's like 10,000 spoons when all you need is a knife...well, actually it's more like the Write Now Challenge Webcast: Isn't it Ironic coming at you this afternoon at 4pm (Pacific)! In this challenge, members were asked to write a short scene (no more than 5 pages) using one of the examples of irony from the Breakdown Webcast: Dramatic Irony. As a reminder the examples for irony are below:  Dramatic Irony: A literary and theatrical device in which the reader or audience knows more about a situation, complication, or conflict than the characters they are following. Classical Irony: This term describes irony as it was used in ancient Greek comedy—to highlight situations in which one thing appears to be the case when, in fact, the opposite is true. Cosmic Irony: Cosmic irony highlights incongruities between the absolute, theoretical world and the mundane, grounded reality of everyday life. Socratic Irony: Socrates would feign ignorance of a subject and ask seemingly innocent—but actually leading—questions to draw out information he already knew. Socratic irony differs from verbal irony because it involves intentional deception. Verbal irony, on the other hand, does not connote insincerity or deception. Situational Irony: occurs when there is a difference between what is expected to happen and what actually happens. With situational irony, our discovery that our expectations haven’t been met are the same as the characters in the story. Verbal Irony: is when a character says something that is different from what he or she really means, or how he or she really feels. This is the only type of irony where a character creates the irony. 

The Write Now Challenge Webcast: Mr. or Mrs. Wrong!

We are turning the spotlight - and the microphones - back over to you during the Write Now Challenge webcast!In this challenge, you were asked to write a scene (3 pages) in which a character anticipates the arrival of one character, but instead, an unexpected visitor shows up, and that visitor is the absolute most wrong person. Your main character then needs to come up with a creative lie to get rid of the unexpected visitor. Ask yourself, why is that person the most wrong person in that moment? What tactics does he or she use to try and get rid of the unexpected visitor? How does the tension escalate between characters? How are you conveying the differences in the characters' voices in your writing?

The Write Now Challenge Webcast: True Stories & Biopics

During the Write Now Challenge, we turned the spotlight - and the microphones - back over to you during the Write Now Challenge Webcast!  Using the "Breakdown Webcast: Writing True Stories" as a guide, your challenge was to find a true story or subject of a biopic that resonates with you! Write a short document that details the subject of the project - whether a historic event, historical figure, or a combination of both - including a "way into the story," principal character(s), basic synopsis, potential themes for exploration, and why it resonates with you as the writer. During the webcast, participants discussed true stories and historical figures that were either well-known or obscure, but all riveting! Participants described accounts from the US Civil War, Korean War, legal battles, pro-wrestling, and many more!   

register for stage 32 Register / Log In