Screenwriters: The Real Reasons Why You’re Not Getting Signed

A No B.S. Look At How Managers Actually Approach Signing Writers Straight From The Mouth Of A Respected Hollywood Manager Himself!
Hosted by Lee Stobby

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Lee Stobby

Webinar hosted by: Lee Stobby

Manager at Lee Stobby Management

About Your Instructor, Lee Stobby: A graduate of the University of Michigan, Lee Stobby is a literary manager and producer who has learned from some of Hollywood’s greatest minds at Misher Films, Double Feature Films, Industry Entertainment, Innovative Artists and Caliber Media; the lattermost is where he began representing literary clients in 2011. A champion of strong, independent voices and quality cinema, Lee just started his own shingle, Lee Stobby Entertainment, and his clients include: Lindsay Stidham who wrote Sundance hits Douchbag and Spooner; Kate Trefry whose script Pure O made The Black List 2013; Greg Sullivan whose script Erin’s Voice made The Black List 2014; Isaac Adamson who is the author of Tokyo Scukerpunch and other books in the Billy Chaka series published by HarperCollins; and Rodney Ascher whose documentary Room 237 was the talk of Sundance and Cannes and his second feature, The Nightmare, just premiered at Sundance 2015. Full Bio »

Learn directly from Lee Stobby whose clients include writers on films that have premiered at Sundance and Cannes, as well as a stable of multiple writers on the Black List!

Stage 32 is here to give you an honest, no B.S. look at how managers actually approach signing writers, straight from the mouth of a respected Hollywood manager himself. If you’re looking for a sugarcoated opinion on why you haven’t been signed yet, this webinar isn’t for you, but if you’re serious about wanting to take your career to the next level and can handle the blunt and honest truth, buckle up and get ready to learn!

In this Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, host Lee Stobby will provide insight into how he as a manager looks for material and clients. He will discuss the most common turn offs and red flags that kill his interest, even if he liked your script or writing (such as not in LA, “bad” personality, not having a script that is ready to go, or soft concepts). He will then go over ways to overcome these things and accent your strengths. You will learn what types of scripts play best on script hosting websites, how to utilize coverage services, how to get executives to read your script and subsequently refer to reps, how to write scripts that get attention in contests, other ways to get attention on your script, and why being in the relentless search of representation may not be the best use of your time. You will leave with a clear understanding of the mistakes you’ve been unknowingly making and directions on how to avoid continuing to make them, giving yourself a better chance of finally getting signed!

Your host Lee Stobby has learned from some of Hollywood’s greatest minds at Misher Films, Double Feature Films, Industry Entertainment, Innovative Artists and Caliber Media; the lattermost is where he began representing literary clients in 2011. Lee is a champion of strong, independent voices and has a knack for finding some of the most in-demand spec scripts on the market. Lee just started his own shingle, Lee Stobby Entertainment, where his clients include writers on films that have premiered at Sundance and Cannes, as well as a stable of multiple writers on the Black List. Lee knows what makes a great client / writer and is here exclusively for Stage 32 to partake some of his knowledge, energy and passion to help writers increase their chances of finally getting representation.


What You'll Learn:

What You Will Learn:

  • You (or your script) are not unique enough.
    • Are you writing what you love and have personal experience with? Are you an expert in your script/story?
    • What do people want in high concept ideas?
    • What makes a great TV writer vs. a film writer?
  • Your script is not marketable/ TV show is not sellable.
    • Don’t write an expensive project that will die on the vine in the best-case scenario.
    • How to write with a budget in mind.
    • What are the best things to write for TV?
  • Your first 15 are not your best pages.
    • Everyone in Hollywood reads until they figure out there is nothing they can do with a script. Don’t give this to them easily!
  • Your pitch and/or logline doesn’t represent your entire script.
    • What is a good logline pitch?
    • What should you give away vs. keep secret?
    • What is the best way to frame a story?
  • Queries: the dos and don’ts.
    • What will make a manager immediately delete your email and not wnt to have further contact?
  • You don’t create a sense of urgency.
    • How to make representatives feel like they will miss out if they don’t sign you.
  • Ageism.
    • Are you “too old”?
    • Why do reps love “young” clients?
    • How can you make this not matter?
  • You’re a jerk.
    • The difference between being strong and confident and being difficult.
    • The warning signs managers look for.
  • Living in LA.
    • Why it is actually important.
    • How can you have a successful career and get signed while not living in LA?
  • You’re a “Hip Pocket” client.
    • What does this term mean?
    • How do you know if you’re a “hip pocket” client?
    • Why would you be a “hip pocket” client vs. a full-blown client, and how do you get yourself out of the pocket?
  • Contests hate your script.
    • Contests are not all created equal and some writers/scripts do better in some than in others.
    • How can you write for contests and which ones are the best to aim for.
  • You’re not taking your career into your own hands.
    • What kind of momentum/activity can you generate yourself that is appealing to representatives?
    • Representatives like to jump on moving trains!
  • You’re not thinking ahead!
    • Getting representation doesn’t mean your work ends – it means it actually begins!
    • How can you make sure you are always driving force behind your career?
    • How to keep representatives (and Hollywood in general) excited about you.
  • Recorded, in-depth Q&A with Lee!

About Your Instructor:

About Your Instructor, Lee Stobby:

A graduate of the University of Michigan, Lee Stobby is a literary manager and producer who has learned from some of Hollywood’s greatest minds at Misher Films, Double Feature Films, Industry Entertainment, Innovative Artists and Caliber Media; the lattermost is where he began representing literary clients in 2011. A champion of strong, independent voices and quality cinema, Lee just started his own shingle, Lee Stobby Entertainment, and his clients include: Lindsay Stidham who wrote Sundance hits Douchbag and Spooner; Kate Trefry whose script Pure O made The Black List 2013; Greg Sullivan whose script Erin’s Voice made The Black List 2014; Isaac Adamson who is the author of Tokyo Scukerpunch and other books in the Billy Chaka series published by HarperCollins; and Rodney Ascher whose documentary Room 237 was the talk of Sundance and Cannes and his second feature, The Nightmare, just premiered at Sundance 2015.


Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 


Testimonials:

Testimonials:

“Excellent: great practical pointers on the re-write process and an honest, uncensored perspective on the industry. Thanks for a truly useful and insightful seminar!” – Terrance T.

“Being a new writer, it's so hard to find someone in the industry who is objective about the writing process…I learned a sheer ton [and] liked that you didn't sugarcoat things and spent the time expanding beyond just the rewriting process and what the expectations are of a new writer. It makes such a difference, and I had no idea about a majority of those things until I took your class! Thank you!” – Aarthi R.

“I think Lee's a great teacher. He touched on some important subjects, like what he looks for in a pitch and how to query. His managerial strength is in how he recognizes great scripts through outstanding characters and dialogue.” - Nicole E.

“Lee Stobby,: the BEST EVER…He was so generous with his comments…Thank you Stage 32 for introducing Lee to us. He was amaziing... Lee definitely knows what he's doing!” – Sylvia L.

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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